Iris Buchholz Chocolate, Os sonhos do embondeiro (Baobab’s Dreams), 2012. Video, sound, 14 min., 14 sec.
Sights and Sounds: Global Film and Video | Angola closes in the galleries today. Learn more.
Iris Buchholz Chocolate, Os sonhos do embondeiro (Baobab’s Dreams), 2012. Video, sound, 14 min., 14 sec.
Sights and Sounds: Global Film and Video | Angola closes in the galleries today. Learn more.

Iris Buchholz Chocolate, Os sonhos do embondeiro (Baobab’s Dreams), 2012. Video, sound, 14 min., 14 sec.

Sights and Sounds: Global Film and Video | Angola closes in the galleries today. Learn more.

Mel Bochner, Amazing, 2011. Artwork © Mel Bochner

In 1964, the young artist Mel Bochner, who had just arrived in New York from Pittsburgh, visited the Jewish Museum to see Jasper Johns’s “White Flag.” At the museum, he ran into a former classmate from Carnegie Tech, who was working at the museum as a guard. Bochner was unemployed and looking for work, and he asked his friend whether there might there be a position for him, too. A guard had quit the day before, his friend said, so Bochner may as well inquire at the office on his way out. He did, and was hired that day. (Years later, Bochner learned that the guard he’d replaced was Brice Marden.)

Read more from The New Yorker’s discussion with artist Mel Bochner about the exhibition Strong Language, on view through September 21, here.
Mel Bochner, Amazing, 2011. Artwork © Mel Bochner

In 1964, the young artist Mel Bochner, who had just arrived in New York from Pittsburgh, visited the Jewish Museum to see Jasper Johns’s “White Flag.” At the museum, he ran into a former classmate from Carnegie Tech, who was working at the museum as a guard. Bochner was unemployed and looking for work, and he asked his friend whether there might there be a position for him, too. A guard had quit the day before, his friend said, so Bochner may as well inquire at the office on his way out. He did, and was hired that day. (Years later, Bochner learned that the guard he’d replaced was Brice Marden.)

Read more from The New Yorker’s discussion with artist Mel Bochner about the exhibition Strong Language, on view through September 21, here.

Mel Bochner, Amazing, 2011. Artwork © Mel Bochner

In 1964, the young artist Mel Bochner, who had just arrived in New York from Pittsburgh, visited the Jewish Museum to see Jasper Johns’s “White Flag.” At the museum, he ran into a former classmate from Carnegie Tech, who was working at the museum as a guard. Bochner was unemployed and looking for work, and he asked his friend whether there might there be a position for him, too. A guard had quit the day before, his friend said, so Bochner may as well inquire at the office on his way out. He did, and was hired that day. (Years later, Bochner learned that the guard he’d replaced was Brice Marden.)

Read more from The New Yorker’s discussion with artist Mel Bochner about the exhibition Strong Language, on view through September 21, here.

TOMORROW is one of our favorite days of the year - the 2014 Museum Mile Festival! Stop by from 6-9 pm for free admission, family art-making activities, live music and more. 

Photos: 2013 Museum Mile Festival; Will Ragozzino/SocialShutterbug.com

Sunday, May 18 is your last chance to experience Other Primary Structures: Others 1, the first of two parts of the exhibition Other Primary Structures! Others 2 opens May 25. Check out this video to learn more about the exhibition!

See Mel Bochner’s wall piece Language Is Not Transparent (1970) re-created for the exhibition Mel Bochner: Strong Language over on our YouTube channel: http://youtu.be/E8q-kye5nsA

Mel Bochner, Language Is Not Transparent, 1970, re-created for the exhibition at the Jewish Museum.  Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Modern and Contemporary Art Council.

Judy Chicago (American, born 1939). Rainbow Pickett, 1965/2004. Latex paint on canvas-covered plywood, 126 x 126 x 110 in. (320 x 320 x 279.4 cm). Collection of David and Diane Waldman, Waldman Family Trust, Rancho Mirage, California. © Judy Chicago. Photo © Donald Woodman
More about tomorrow’s event, Judy Chicago: The Saga of Rainbow Pickett, at the link.
Judy Chicago (American, born 1939). Rainbow Pickett, 1965/2004. Latex paint on canvas-covered plywood, 126 x 126 x 110 in. (320 x 320 x 279.4 cm). Collection of David and Diane Waldman, Waldman Family Trust, Rancho Mirage, California. © Judy Chicago. Photo © Donald Woodman
More about tomorrow’s event, Judy Chicago: The Saga of Rainbow Pickett, at the link.

Judy Chicago (American, born 1939). Rainbow Pickett, 1965/2004. Latex paint on canvas-covered plywood, 126 x 126 x 110 in. (320 x 320 x 279.4 cm). Collection of David and Diane Waldman, Waldman Family Trust, Rancho Mirage, California. © Judy Chicago. Photo © Donald Woodman

More about tomorrow’s event, Judy Chicago: The Saga of Rainbow Pickett, at the link.