What’s that you say? National Coffee Day? Why yes, in fact – and the Shop is celebrating with a 30% discount on ALL MUGS today only! Use promo code MUG4COFFEE at checkout.
Offer expires midnight tonight.
What’s that you say? National Coffee Day? Why yes, in fact – and the Shop is celebrating with a 30% discount on ALL MUGS today only! Use promo code MUG4COFFEE at checkout.
Offer expires midnight tonight.

What’s that you say? National Coffee Day? Why yes, in fact – and the Shop is celebrating with a 30% discount on ALL MUGS today only! Use promo code MUG4COFFEE at checkout.

Offer expires midnight tonight.

Thanks to everyone who joined us for last night’s Dialogue and Discourse on artist Mel Bochner’s work. Remember – Mel Bochner: Strong Language closes Sunday!
Thanks to everyone who joined us for last night’s Dialogue and Discourse on artist Mel Bochner’s work. Remember – Mel Bochner: Strong Language closes Sunday!

Thanks to everyone who joined us for last night’s Dialogue and Discourse on artist Mel Bochner’s work. Remember – Mel Bochner: Strong Language closes Sunday!

Just three weekends left to catch Mel Bochner: Strong Language before the exhibition closes on September 21. 
Mel Bochner, Going Out of Business, 2012, oil on velvet, 93 ½ × 70 ¼ in. (237. 5 x 178.4 cm). Private collection, New York. Artwork © Mel Bochner.
Just three weekends left to catch Mel Bochner: Strong Language before the exhibition closes on September 21. 
Mel Bochner, Going Out of Business, 2012, oil on velvet, 93 ½ × 70 ¼ in. (237. 5 x 178.4 cm). Private collection, New York. Artwork © Mel Bochner.

Just three weekends left to catch Mel Bochner: Strong Language before the exhibition closes on September 21. 

Mel Bochner, Going Out of Business, 2012, oil on velvet, 93 ½ × 70 ¼ in. (237. 5 x 178.4 cm). Private collection, New York. Artwork © Mel Bochner.

letmypeopleshow:

Jewish Museum Show Spotlights 2 Abstract Expressionist Masters Who Were Left Out of Spotlight (Maybe Because They Were Black and Female?)

She was born in 1908 to Russian parents was raised in Brooklyn.

He was born in 1909 to immigrants from Bermuda, and grew up in Harlem.

Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis both studied art in New York, explored Social Realism in their work with the Federal Art Project, and refined their personal abstract language in the ’40s and ’50s. They both developed signature styles that summon classic elements of Abstract Expressionism, playing with gesture and color and line that almost resolves into writing. And both had shows in prestigious New York galleries.

But the two artists, the black man and the Jewish woman best known as Jackson Pollock’s wife, shared another quality: few people wrote about their work.

“A noticeable lack of critical reception” is how Norman Kleeblatt, chief curator at the Jewish Museum, puts it in the catalogue for “From the Margins,” an exhibition featuring paintings the two artists made between 1945 and ‘52.

The show, opening September 12, creates a suggestive painterly conversation, at times articulated in the rhythms of early Modernism, Hebrew and bebop.

And it reminds us that the story of Abstract Expressionism is still being written. 

Plan a visit this Labor Day! We will be open on Monday, September 1.
Installation view of Mel Bochner: Strong Language at the Jewish Museum, New York. Artwork © Mel Bochner. Photo by Will Ragozzino/SocialShutterbug.com
Plan a visit this Labor Day! We will be open on Monday, September 1.
Installation view of Mel Bochner: Strong Language at the Jewish Museum, New York. Artwork © Mel Bochner. Photo by Will Ragozzino/SocialShutterbug.com

Plan a visit this Labor Day! We will be open on Monday, September 1.

Installation view of Mel Bochner: Strong Language at the Jewish Museum, New York. Artwork © Mel Bochner. Photo by Will Ragozzino/SocialShutterbug.com